The Seaside Calls


One girl's mission to escape monotony

Black Diamond Cemetery | Washington

This was, without a doubt, the creepiest cemetery experience I’ve ever had… and I loved every minute of it. While I was planning my trip to Washington, I couldn’t pass up a visit to the state’s most haunted cemetery. The drive was just under two hours from Silverdale. As soon as we got into King County, things started getting weird. Unfortunately, we were on a race against the setting sun, so we didn’t have time to photograph the horrors we witnessed along the drive.

The first thing we noticed was a Victorian mansion on the side of the road. There was a couch sitting in front covered in glass dolls, and a sign advertising that you could have tea with the dolls … Then we had to drive on this really dark and windy road for about 8 miles. The trees were overgrown to the point where you couldn’t see the sky. The canopies were keeping the sunlight from reaching the road, so it felt like it was night. There was an old abandoned bridge on the side of the road and a bunch of abandoned buildings. About halfway down the road, we saw a sign nailed to a telephone pole that just said “handyman”, followed by a phone number. Noelle and I both concluded that it was put there by a serial killer. Right around this time, we noticed a white van following us (and that was the only living soul we saw in the whole area).

Things only got scarier when we made it to the cemetery. After walking around for a few minutes, we began to hear a chainsaw and very loud screaming coming from the nearby houses. Eventually the chainsaw and the screaming both stopped… at the same time. A few minutes later, we could hear what sounded like a gramophone recording of a woman singing something Tiny Tim-esque. As we strolled through the graves, we were both on the alert, convinced that an axe murder was sure to jump out of the surrounding pines at any moment.

 

 

I have a theory that Victorian-era cemeteries are the most haunted due to that generation’s deep interest in Spiritualism. That theory seems to align with this particular cemetery.

Black Diamond was a mining town during the 1800’s, and visitors have reported hearing whistling, smelling strange smells, and seeing the dead miners’ lanterns swinging in the fog. A few have also reported seeing an apparition of a white horse. I can’t claim to have experienced any of these, but Noelle and I were both overcome with a feeling of unease that neither of us had ever experienced before. It was awesome. And terrifying. And awesome.

I found an instagram account run by a couple of ghost hunters, and they posted a video of an EVP they took at Black Diamond Cemetery. I don’t know if I believe that it’s real, but it gave me chills.

 

 

 

One thing you’ll notice when visiting any Victorian cemetery is the frequent amount of children’s graves. Thanks to the lack of sanitation, poor nutrition, and the many rampant diseases, only two in every 10 babies born would live until their second birthdays.

 

 

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And, of course, we just had to take a few etherial, death-inspired portraits. Then, as the sun finally set, we rushed back to the car because the strange noises were starting up again and we were extremely creeped out. Someday I will return to Black Diamond, and I will use this horrifying experience as inspiration for a short film. Mark my words. Mere words cannot convey how frightening this experience was, so I’m committed to recreating my experience as accurately as possible for you all to enjoy.

 

 

Have you ever experienced something paranormal? I want to hear your stories! Let me know in the comments below ⬇👻

 

Nena’s Travel Essentials

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Brontë Country | West Yorkshire, England

“I bounded, leaped, and flew down the steep road; then, quitting its windings, shot direct across the moor, rolling over banks, and wading through marshes”

-Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

 

Most of the Brontë sisters’ writings include descriptions of the Yorkshire moors, and they were truly a sight to behold. I felt like I was Jane Eyre, and that’s pretty much all I’ve ever wanted to be. I honestly would have preferred to have visited on a cold and gloomy day to get the full Yorkshire experience, but at least it wasn’t hot. After I’d had enough of the beautiful surrounding landscapes, it was a short drive to the village of Haworth, where the Brontë sisters lived and died.

 

 

The Brontë Parsonage Museum

 

 

For those of you who may be unfamiliar with the Brontë sisters, I’ll give you a little background:  Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Brontë  were stereotypical Victorian girls. Charlotte and Emily, as well as their older sisters, Maria and Elizabeth, were sent away to school in early childhood, three years after their mother passed away. They remained there until Maria and Elizabeth became sick and died. Charlotte and Emily returned home to their grieving father, brother, and little sister, Anne. Charlotte, Emily, and Anne turned to writing, and their works were heavily influenced by their own heartbreaking experiences. They all gained fame by 1847, their most notable works being Jane Eyre (written by Charlotte), Wuthering Heights (written by Emily), and Agnes Grey (written by Anne).

These photos are of their home, their grounds, the church they attended, and the church’s graveyard. Inside the Haworth Parsonage Museum, pictures aren’t technically allowed, but you can get away with sneaking a few when no one’s looking. The home is filled with fantastic treasures and artifacts from the family’s time on earth, which I spent hours geeking out over.

 

 

The Graveyard

 

It was a melancholy experience getting to see this beautiful area fraught with such a tragic history, but I am a lover of the dark and disturbing, so it was right up my alley.

 

 

The Church

 

Unfortunately, like most Victorians, all of the Brontë sisters died young. Emily caught a severe cold at her brother’s funeral in 1848, which soon developed into tuberculosis and killed her at the age of 30. Anne died the following year of tuberculosis, at the age of 29. After six years without any of her siblings, Charlotte became ill and died three weeks before her 39th birthday, along with her unborn child. She had been married less than a year, and her last words were, “I am not going to die, am I? God will not separate us. We have been so happy.”

Heartbreaking, right!? The Brontës were not buried in the church graveyard, but within the church itself. All except Anne, that is, who passed away in Scarborough and was laid to rest there.

 

 

Here you can see the names of all of the men who led the local church over the years, including the girls’ father, Patrick.

 

 

What’s in my suitcase

 

Bolton Abbey

 

 

Bolton Abbey really inspires the romantic in me. The haunting ruins put me in mind of Thornfield Hall from Charlotte’s Jane Eyre, which made it the perfect next stop on my road trip. It’s the kind of place that makes me want to recite some Byron. Or some Brydon.

Yes, as much as I adore the poetry of Lord Byron, I spent most of my time here channeling my inner Rob Brydon while reenacting one of my favorite scenes from The Trip. If you’re planning a trip to Northern England, you absolutely must watch this film first.

 

 

 

If you’re as big of a Downton Abbey fan as I am, you may be thinking, “this looks more like a church than an abbey.” You’re right. The ruins are actually that of a Gothic Priory that began construction in 1154. When Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries in 1539, Bolton was stripped of anything that could be sold, and the Eastern half was essentially abandoned. The Western half, however, was kept intact and religious services are still held inside. As an American, it’s not often that I get to behold such ancient ruins, let alone walk through them. It was like stepping back in time.

 

 

There’s this great little stone bridge you can walk across, but it’s not as easy as it looks. Some of the stones are farther apart than others, some are wobbly, and some aren’t even fully above the surface of the water. Amazingly, I managed to make it to the other side without falling into the water, but just barely. When you get across, there are a bunch of friendly cows wandering about.

 

 

After the bustle of London, this was the perfect country getaway. In the city, even a city as historic as London, you’re constantly reminded of the present. It’s hard to imagine living in another time when you’re surrounded by McDonalds’ and double-decker busses. But, in the north, there are less distractions and more chances to be reminded of what once was. I delight at any chance I get to immerse myself in another time. Some people like to escape reality by visiting Disneyland. Well, this is my Disneyland.

Of all the Brontë’s, I’ve always admired Charlotte the most. Jane Eyre is my favorite novel, and one I think all women should read. If it weren’t for Jane Eyre, I wouldn’t be a world traveler. I wouldn’t be an independent woman. I wouldn’t be who I am now. Visiting Yorkshire and walking the same streets Charlotte walked allowed me to connect with her in a very special way.

So, if you haven’t already, I challenge you to read Jane Eyre (hell, read all the Brontë novels), and then visit the place where it all began. You won’t regret it.

 

Nena’s Travel Essentials


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Stonehenge | Salisbury, England

All of my life, I have been infatuated with Stonehenge. In fact, when I was first starting my photography business, I experimented with calling it Stonehenge Photography. Thankfully I came to my senses before ordering any business cards 😅

When I finally stood before this age-old monument, I was absolutely in awe.

This girl totally brought a Gandalf action figure with her and now she’s kind of a hero to me.

I always sound crazy when I try to explain this to people, but when I visit some place new, the first thing I always notice is that the quality of light is so different than any of the other places I’ve been. The way the rays penetrate the clouds, the constant shifting between shadow and direct sunlight… It’s nothing like the consistent, even sunlight in my hometown of San Diego. Stonehenge was no exception, and I still can’t find the words to describe this phenomena. It’s just inexplicably different. One minute the landscape would be engulfed in shadow, and the next minute the amount of light would be blinding.

What’s In My Wardrobe

It’s estimated that it took the Neolithic peoples about 1,500 years to build Stonehenge. Amazingly, the whole thing is made up of about 100 stones. The bizarre part is that some of these stones were traced to an area in Wales about 200 miles from where Stonehenge sits. How the Neolithics managed to move them that far, no one knows. It’s been suggested that the Druids, or even the wizard Merlin may have actually been responsible for its construction, but historians now believe that it was built thousands of years before Merlin or the Druids inhabited the area. But part of me still wants to believe that it was actually Merlin, because that’s way more fun to think about! No one can say for certain what Stonehenge’s purpose was, but some theories are that it was used as a burial site, an astronomical calendar, a memorial to ancestors, or a religious pilgrimage site.

As amazing as it was to behold these ancient stones, the surroundings served as a constant reminder that the world had outgrown them.

I don’t know why, but when I would envision this moment, sprinklers were never present in my fantasies

I’ve always been fascinated with the concept of time. The way it lingers and yet is too fast for anyone to catch. The strange reality of how the earth eventually forgets her past inhabitants. The way man tries to make sense of the remnants of lost societies and cultures.

When I began to notice the wildlife in the area, I started thinking about how weirdly amusing it is that they spend their lives in the presence of one of the most ancient wonders of the world, and they have no idea how important it is.

The English countryside is a sight I can never get enough of. I could have stayed here all day, but, as always, there were more adventures to be had!

England is truly a remarkable place. You can be in the heart of modern civilization and take a two hour drive to one of the world’s most ancient sights. A lot of the most popular destinations are nothing more than tourist traps, but visiting Stonehenge is 100% worth it. I’m so overwhelmed and so grateful that I can finally cross this off my bucket list.

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Pinterested in sharing? I’ll love you forever!

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Black Books | London, England

Collinge & Clark Bookstore

If you have never watched Black Books, you’re missing out.

Black Books was written by and stars Irish comedian, Dylan Moran. It’s about an ornery bookshop owner, Bernard Black, whose worst nightmares include interacting with people and being responsible, both of which are necessary for successfully maintaining a business (in other words, he’s basically me). He hires Manny (played by Bill Bailey), an upbeat and friendly employee who proves to be great help in running the shop, but whose positive attitude and work ethic drive Bernard mad. It’s one of the few shows I can re-watch over and over again and never stop laughing.

To give you a little taste, here is one of my favorite scenes.

Black Books was filmed in a bookshop in London called Collinge & Clark, so obviously that was the #1 attraction I wanted to visit during my stay in the city. Unfortunately, the shop has very irregular hours, so it wasn’t open on the day I could squeeze in a visit, but I was happy enough to see it from the outside. Plus, it gives me a very legitimate reason to visit London again.

If you held a gun to my head and told me to definitively state what the best sitcom of all time was, I’d honestly have to say Black Books. It’s THAT good. I’ve literally seen it at least 30 times all the way through.

I’d like to say I’m a Fran, but in reality, I’m a total Bernard. Chaotic, messy, antisocial… but also strangely attractive 😏💕

I made my brother pose with me.

So that’s all for this short & sweet entry in my travel journal! If you haven’t already, watch the show, visit London, and hunt down Collinge & Clark. The British Museum is within walking distance, and there’s also a Shake Shack nearby, which is by far the best fast food chain ever.

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Looking for a new show to binge? Get the full series on DVD!

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Stone Church Ruins | Eleroy, Illinois

The Old Eleroy Stone Church

You know the best thing about road trips? Besides snacking on beef jerky and slurpees? Finding weird things on the side of the road. Especially abandoned things. If it looks like it’s been forgotten by society, I’m in love. This was one of those discoveries that was a matter of being in the right place at the right time.

We were driving from Galena, IL back to my aunt’s home in Chicago, when I noticed this stone church without a roof, and very clear signs of fire damage. Obviously I made my aunt pull over, and I went in to explore. The caution tape did not deter me… in fact, it made my rebellious side come out. I wouldn’t say I break the law often, but I’ve definitely done my fair share of trespassing. I think most photographers have a tendency to do things like that, but it’s totally fine because it’s all in the name of art 😉

After doing a little research, I found out that this building actually hadn’t served as a church for a couple decades, and had recently been utilized as an antique shop. The owner lived inside, so unfortunately he lost both his shop and his home… and possibly his cat, from what the locals were saying on Facebook. The fire had taken place a few weeks before I stumbled upon it.

I tried to go in, but I didn’t get far. From wall to wall, the building was completely full of fallen beams, chairs, and other debris.

The stained glass windows had fallen out and were still laying in small fragments on the ground below. The strong scent of fire still lingered in the air.

I don’t know what is to become of this building, or how long it will sit there in this condition, but getting to explore it in its abandoned splendor was exactly the kind of thing I live for.

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Graceland Cemetery | Chicago

Day 1 In Chicago

Half of my family live in Chicago, so I usually visit the city at least once a year. Having been so many times, I wanted to skip the usual attractions and explore corners of the city I’d never seen before. So, naturally, I asked my cousin to take me to a cemetery. I was not disappointed. Graceland Cemetery is one of the largest and grandest graveyards I’ve ever had the pleasure of strolling through. Well, in this case, it was less like strolling and more like trekking. The grounds span nearly 120 acres, so we spent about 3 hours wandering in the horrible humidity of June. I kid you not, the cemetery provides maps for its visitors because it’s so easy to get lost.

The History

Graceland Cemetery was built in 1860. After the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, many of the bodies which were originally laid to rest in Lincoln Park were transferred to Graceland. Unlike our usual dark and gloomy idea of cemeteries, Graceland was designed to have a comfortable, park-like atmosphere. During the 1800’s, this was actually quite common. When people felt like spending time outside, they would often go for walks through their local graveyards. Victorian-era cemeteries were made to feel welcoming. Unlike the tight, ordered rows of graves in modern cemeteries, the Victorian graves were purposefully placed in an irregular manner, leaving plenty of space for visitors to weave through them as they walked. 

Notable Graves

Here lies Inez Clarke, daughter of John and Mary Clarke (although there is some speculation that she is actually Inez Briggs, Mary’s daughter from a previous marriage). Legend has it that Inez died when struck by lightning, either during a picnic or while being locked outside. They say that her statue disappears during lightning storms because poor Inez is so afraid.

Here lies Dexter Graves. He died in 1845, and was one of the bodies moved to Graceland after the fire. His remains are guarded by a terrifying statue entitled, “Eternal Silence”, which was created by Lorado Taft in 1909. There’s a legend that if you look into the figure’s eyes,  you will be given a vision of your own death.

See anything? 
          

Jack Johnson

Can we just take a moment to appreciate the fact that this woman’s name was Olive Branch? 

I love finding graves without a death date, especially when there is no possible way that they could still be alive. I like to imagine good ol’ Marie enjoying her golden years (she’d be 128 as of 2016) sipping mimosas on some beach in the Bahamas.

Sorry, kids. Santa has been dead since 1914.

Other Highlights 

Graceland Cemetery, final resting place to so many of Chicago’s elite, was so overwhelming. So much land, so many spectacular graves, some of which don’t even seem like they could possibly be in Chicago. Overall, I give this cemetery an A+, but, if you plan to visit, I suggest that you avoid going on one of the hottest days of the year, because you will be miserable.

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Snæfellsnes | Iceland

Day 9 In Iceland

Snæfellsnes

The peninsula of Snæfellsnes is about a two hour drive from Reykjavik, and spans about 90 kilometers. The area consists of marshes, black sand beaches, mountains, glaciers, and a few small towns.

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Arnarstapi

Iceland restaurant
The little restaurant I ate at at the base of Mt. Stapafell

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Iceland hill
That glacier in the background is called Snæfellsjökull

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Iceland house

Djúpalónssandur beach

As I walked towards the ocean, there were these massive walls made of hardened lava that you had to walk through.
As I walked towards the ocean, there were these massive walls made of hardened lava that you had to walk through.

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One of the beaches even has the remnants of a 1913 shipwreck strewn across the shore, which was super cool to me because I kind of have an obsession with shipwrecks.
One of the beaches even has the remnants of a 1913 shipwreck strewn across the shore, which was super cool to me because I kind of have an obsession with shipwrecks.

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I love the volcanic sand… If you look carefully, theres a couple kissing in the bottom left corner.

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The Blue Lagoon | Grindavik, Iceland

Day 3 In Iceland

The Blue Lagoon

Ahhh, yes. The Blue Lagoon. This geothermal spa is basically the Eiffel Tower of Iceland- this is what people come here for. This spa, which was actually created on accident, has become such a popular attraction, not only because it is beautiful, but also because this warm water has soothing and healing properties! People come from all over the world to soak in the murky water, and leave with silky smooth skin! Jars of warm earthy clay are situated all over the lagoon, for face masks! The bottom is covered in black sand, and some weirdly smooth rocks that feel more like Venetian glass than part of the natural landscape.

blue lagoon

to add to the relaxation, there is a bar in the middle of the lagoon that you can swim to for a refreshing (and overpriced) slushee or alcoholic beverage.
To add to the relaxation, there is a bar in the middle of the lagoon that you can swim to for a refreshing (and overpriced) slushee or alcoholic beverage.

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The only downside to this place is that you have to shower naked with a million other naked people, most of them elderly and overweight… I’m an art major- I see nudity a hundred times a day and it doesn’t usually phase me, but I saw some things that can never be unseen here. That being said, if you can just close your eyes until you get through the showers, it’s totally worth the experience!

Phallological Museum | Reykjavik, Iceland

Day 1 In Iceland

The Icelandic Phallological Museum

After strolling a bit more through the streets of Reykjavik, I found what I was looking for. The Icelandic Phallological Museum: home to over 280 real penises from various species, including human! I am a big fan of all things bizarre and disturbing, and this was one of the more bizarre and disturbing museums I’ve visited. And I loved every minute of it. They claim to have at least one penis from every mammal native to Iceland, and they also have some exotic specimen that have been donated, such as giraffe and zebra.

Penises. Need I say more?
Penises. Need I say more?

penis museum

scrotum lampshades
scrotum lampshades
The penis of a sperm whale is proudly displayed in the center of the museum, and it is as big as me. Talk about awkward.
The penis of a sperm whale is proudly displayed in the center of the museum, and it is as big as me. Talk about awkward.
Human Testicle. The penis itself is in a nearby jar, but these specimen weren't preserved properly, so they became shriveled up and discolored. They are currently looking to acquire a "bigger and better" specimen.
Human Testicle. The penis itself is in a nearby jar, but these specimen weren’t preserved properly, so they became shriveled up and discolored. They are currently looking to acquire a “bigger and better” specimen.
They say this jar contains the penis of an elf (it is believed, in Icelandic Folklore, that elves are invisible)
They say this jar contains the penis of an elf (it is believed, in Icelandic Folklore, that elves are invisible)
Turns out walrus penises have bones in them
Turns out walrus penises have bones in them

whale penis 2 jars whale penis

Some of the exotic pieces.
Some of the exotic pieces.

My Favorite City In The World | Reykjavik, Iceland

Feels Like Home

 

After thirteen hours of flying, I finally landed in beautiful Reykjavik, the capital of Iceland! Well, technically I landed in Keflavik, but then I took a bus directly to the heart of Reykjavik. My Airbnb was in an idyllic location, and nearly everything I wanted to see was within walking distance. When I got there, I contacted the host, who told me to get the key from the blacksmith downstairs. I thought to myself, “Blacksmith? How quaint!”

 

reykjavik

 

I was exhausted by the time I made it into the apartment, so when I got there I went straight to sleep. When I woke up around 7 p.m., I realized I was in good company. Maybe it’s because I was in a pretty hip area, but everyone slept all day and then hit the town around midnight, staying out until the bars closed in the morning. Every night I enjoyed the loud ambient music echoing through the streets, as I watched people taking walks, laughing and drinking. Then, at 6 a.m., it all stopped and the city was completely silent. A night owl like myself could definitely get used to living in such a city.

 

 

The next day I set out to explore the city. As I was on my way out, my roommate’s friend came over with a karaoke machine, and took it out on the balcony to perform for all the passersby. I was only able to get this short clip, but you get the idea.

 

Hallgrímskirkja

 

The next day around noon, I ventured down to Hallgrímskirkja, Reykjavik’s iconic church. It can be seen throughout most of the city, and my apartment was no exception. Feeling confident in my navigational skills, I decided to just walk towards it until I got there, no map or anything. So what if I got lost? There is no safer city in the world to get lost in! So I grabbed my walking shoes, my lucky scarf, and my camera bag and started walking.

One thing I have noticed every time I’ve visited Europe is that people WALK differently than they do in the States. No one ever seems to be in a rush; while we Americans love to speed walk, Europeans love to stroll. So, when in Rome… Even at my leisurely European walking pace, it only took me about 20 minutes to get there, and when I did, it was as breathtaking as I had imagined.

 

 

After basking in its glory for a few minutes, I went inside and bought my ticket for the elevator (I wanted to get some shots of the chapel first, but there was a wedding going on). Once I reached the top, I waited for the other tourists to clear out of the room, and then I rushed to a vacant window from which I could photograph the beautiful rooftops of Reykjavik. It was a pretty high window, and I’m a pretty short girl, so even though I stood on the stool they had provided, I wouldn’t have been able to see out the window if I hadn’t had my camera on me. For someone who loves color as much as I do, this was truly a wonder to behold.

As I stared in awe at the beautiful city, I was rudely awakened from my deep thought by a loud “BONG…BONG…BONG…”, which caused me to fall off of my stool. Turns out the church has a functioning bell tower directly above the viewing area. I took that as the church’s way of saying “give the other tourists a chance, Nena! You’ve been hogging the window for 20 minutes!”

 

The view from the top of Hallgrímskirkja
The view from the top of Hallgrímskirkja

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I honestly could have stayed there all day, taking in the beauty of the city and the cool ocean breeze, but it was time to start making my way to the next location on my list.

 

Elf School

 

I had heard rumors about Elf School. I had done a little research. It wasn’t what I was expecting. It was, however, an interesting experience. Elves play a major role in Icelandic folklore, and supposedly 50% of Icelanders believe that they exist.

The headmaster (a very eccentric retired professor) gave us our textbooks and sat us all down (there were 8 students total). The classroom was full of little figurines depicting mythical creatures such as elves, dwarves, etc. We were then told many stories about elf sightings in iceland, and his theories as to why elves are not regularly seen… “You must be ‘psychic’ to see elves”, he told us. “Women are more psychic than men, gays are more psychic than non-gays, and children are far more psychic than adults”. This went on for about 4 hours.

As the end of the class neared, the headmaster’s husband brought us freshly made Icelandic pancakes (which are WAY better than American pancakes), ginger ale, and our diplomas. This is a pretty slow-paced attraction, but, then again it is school, so I don’t know what I expected. If you’re looking for something weird and off-beat to do in Reykjavik, this will be an experience you won’t soon forget.

 

The “classroom”

 

The Laundromat Café

 

After such a long class, I was ready for a beer. I’d heard the Laundromat Café was touristy but still pretty awesome, so I checked it out. It was overcrowded for sure, but I loved it because it’s so unique! As you may have guessed, it’s a laundromat and a café, but also a library and bar. A bar full of delicious craft beer, including my all-time favorite beer, Ástrikur Nr. 18 (a Belgian-style ale with hints of peach).

 

 

Why don’t we have these all over the world? Nothing is more boring than sitting around while your laundry is being washed, so you may as well have some food, booze, and books while you wait! It’s also a great opportunity to fill out all those postcards you’ve been blowing off (sorry, friends 😅).

 

 

What’s in my suitcase

 

Reykjavik’s Old West Side

 

This historic part of Reykjavik was probably my favorite part of the city. It’s a bit tucked away, and there were very few tourists in the area. As I ventured further into these residential streets, I noticed the strangers I passed by were all speaking Icelandic, rather than English or German or Dutch.

I stepped into Stofan Café because it looked so adorably chic from the outside. I was delighted to find that the Café was full of locals! The barista even greeted me with a friendly “Gott Kvöld!”

 

She was giving him French lessons. Adorable.
Not my favorite beer, but it was good!

After I’d had my fill of beer, I was back to exploring.

Skúli Magnússon, “Father of Reykjavik” (1711-1794)

 

The reason I had ventured into the Old West Side in the first place was to find Reykjavik’s historic and beautiful Hólavallagarður Cemetery. It was so incredible that I dedicated an entire post to it.

 

 

Back to the Heart of the City

 

After a long day of walking around, I needed a little break. I went to the grocery store to stock up on Lucky Charms, and came back to the apartment for a little nap. Once I was sufficiently energized, I decided to go on a little stroll to get to know my new neighborhood.

 

This is, hands-down, the best logo I’ve ever seen.

Single Gloves speed dating. How cute!

 

Harpa Concert Hall

 

To bring an end to an amazing day, I walked down to the waterfront to marvel at this architectural wonder. The sun finally started to set, and the glass walls caught the light and created the most beautiful array of colors.

 

 

Though I’d be spending two weeks living in Reykjavik, I had many other adventures planned, so this was one of the only days I had dedicated to exploring the city. But, it only took one day for me to realize that I could genuinely see myself living here. Reykjavik is a small but lively city, perfect for an introverted artist like me. It’s a city that truly inspires creativity, but isn’t too busy or crowded. Basically, it’s what I’ve been looking for my whole life.

Any questions about planning a trip here? Drop them below!

 

Nena’s Travel Essentials